Content for #Articles and Perspectives

As we have said before, the procurement of innovation and sustainability in goods and services is not just about R&D, but the design and delivery of public services, processes and models. This is what is behind the Procura+ Awards, …
A few weeks ago, we told you here about our kick-off meeting for the UK Public Spend Forum Best Practices Exchange. A group of 15 or so senior public procurement leaders got together to talk about the idea of …
Earlier this month, I attended a conference on procurement covering both the private and the public sector. One morning, I talked over breakfast with two people from the Cardiff Council in Wales, U.K. We had a nice chat about several topics …
There is one thing I think I know about Donald Trump’s management agenda: I am guessing he likes the General Services Administration. After all, GSA awarded him the contract to redevelop the Old Post Office on Pennsylvania Avenue into a …
The first panel discussion at the recent European Commission Innovative Public Procurement conference in Berlin was titled Procurement of Innovation – Friend or Foe? A slightly obscure title – we think it means whether public procurement is a friend or foe …
Sometime in the next month, we’ll receive the annual report on the number of bid protests filed against federal agencies, and if the trendline continues, there will have been more protests filed in fiscal 2016 than in previous years. And while the …
We found an excellent article here on the foreignpolicy.com website by Elisabeth Braw, looking at the issues around countries sharing military procurement. It is both interesting to the casual reader and informative, and raises some …
Spence Witten is the director of federal sales at cybersecurity vendor Lunarline, Inc. PSF welcomes contributors from across the public sector market. If you're interested in contributing, we'd love to hear from you. I don't know that I've ever said that before. Government Wide Acquisition Contracts (GWACs) and Indefinite Delivery, Indefinite Quantity (IDIQ) solicitations are a nightmare to both write and evaluate. Flashback 10 years ago, to a contract called GSA Alliant I. I was on a team as a subcontractor, along with about 30 other companies, few of whom had ever worked together before. We slammed together a proposal that made no sense and tossed in solutions that we had no intention of delivering. After weeks of frantic days and sleepless nights we eventually dumped on GSA's doorstep a collection of pretty but ultimately meaningless proposal pages. After two years of what I'm sure was the most miserable period of their professional lives, GSA finally awarded Alliant I, and we earned a spot. After a grand win party, I never saw any of my teammates again. To recap: Our proposal offered nothing of value. Our team had no history of working together.  It took the government more than two years to wade through our nonsense and finally make an award. Following award, the team dispersed. The organization that ended up actually delivering on that contract had next to nothing in common with the organization that won. The thing is, as terrible as that sounds (and is), it all started with the way Alliant I was designed.
Plenty of people know the story of the Tech Surge that helped save Healthcare.gov, led by folks like Todd Park, Mikey Dickerson and Ryan Panchadsaram. But not as many people know that after the surge ended on March 31, 2014, there …
Public procurement leaders are subject to all sorts of mandates and policies imposed on them. It’s often difficult to see the forest for the trees, or the outcome the entire team needs to be focused on. Ultimately, they know a few …