Content for #Articles and Perspectives

We have a new research paper available for download – “Contingent Labour Review: Key Procurement Priorities – Setting the scene for change”. This is a paper where the word “research” really means something. It wasn’t just our …
In some ways, the story of Sevie Sarabia (above, right) and Jesse Longoria is unfortunately not unique. Both served in the military, both fought in Iraq. And both also saw how the military supply chain—the way they and their fellow soldiers …
Several years ago, while I was an active duty Air Force acquisition officer, I received a call from a buddy who worked at a large defense contractor (which shall remain nameless). He explained that he was part of a business …
Recently, the Professional Services Council (PSC) raised the alarm about two provisions that were being bandied about to include in this year’s National Defense Authorization Act (NDAA), the big defense spending bill that tows along dozens …
A recent court case in the UK is likely to become a much-quoted example of case law for public procurement legal challenges by unsuccessful bidders. The NDA case (click link to get the full judgement) involves …
We have published a couple of articles recently covering some of the issues around “lots and lotting” and how they apply to public procurement. Here, we looked at the confusion in the EU regulations over the …
Running a workshop last week with around 30 public sector managers, we got into an interesting discussion about the EU procurement directives and the approach to “lots”. That was surprising perhaps, as few of the group were procurement experts, but …
This is a legacy piece form our archives A recent procurement challenge led to a subsequent fascinating legal case in the UK. The case looks set to go down as a landmark case in terms of public procurement regulations …
As a son of an Australian immigrant, one of my father’s most prized possessions—and yet one which my mom kept hidden in a guest room until the past few years as we have dealt with his Alzheimer’s—is a set of two lithograph prints my grandmother brought with them when she and my father immigrated from Sydney, Australia to Amarillo, Texas after World War II. The prints are historical, daily life depictions of Aboriginal culture. This unease of how to deal with the Aboriginal works in our own family is somewhat metaphorical for the social, economic, and cultural problems Australia as a country has had in dealing with this group of over half a million people—now also commonly referred to as the “First Australians” or “Indigenous Australians.”
We listed our six challenges for public procurement in 2015 at the beginning of the month. Here they are again.