Steve Kelman is the Weatherhead Professor of Public Management at Harvard University's John F. Kennedy School of Government. A summa cum laude-graduate of Harvard College, with a Ph.D. in government from Harvard University, he is the author of many books and articles on the policymaking process and on improving the management of government organizations. His latest book, Unleashing Change: A Study of Organizational Change in Government, was published in 2005 by the Brookings Institution Press. His other books include a study on how to improve the government computer procurement process, entitled Procurement and Public Management: The Fear of Discretion and the Quality of Government Performance (AEI Press, 1990), and Making Public Policy: A Hopeful View of American Government (Basic Books, 1987).In 1996 he was elected a Fellow of the National Academy of Public Administration. In 2001, he received the Herbert Roback Memorial Award, the highest achievement award of the National Contract Management Association. In 2003 he was elected as a Director of The Procurement Roundtable. In 2010 the American Political Science Association awarded him the Gaus Prize, which honors a lifetime of achievement in public administration scholarship.He currently serves as editor of the International Public Management Journal, and he writes a regular column for Federal Computer Week and a blog, The Lectern, at FCW.com.From 1993 through 1997, Dr. Kelman served as Administrator of the Office of Federal Procurement Policy in the Office of Management and Budget. During his tenure as Administrator, he played a lead role in the Administration's reinventing government effort. He led Administration efforts in support of the Federal Acquisition Streamlining Act of 1994 and the Federal Acquisition Reform Act of 1995.
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Bio

Steve Kelman is the Weatherhead Professor of Public Management at Harvard University's John F. Kennedy School of Government. A summa cum laude-graduate of Harvard College, with a Ph.D. in government from Harvard University, he is the author of many books and articles on the policymaking process and on improving the management of government organizations. His latest book, Unleashing Change: A Study of Organizational Change in Government, was published in 2005 by the Brookings Institution Press. His other books include a study on how to improve the government computer procurement process, entitled Procurement and Public Management: The Fear of Discretion and the Quality of Government Performance (AEI Press, 1990), and Making Public Policy: A Hopeful View of American Government (Basic Books, 1987).In 1996 he was elected a Fellow of the National Academy of Public Administration. In 2001, he received the Herbert Roback Memorial Award, the highest achievement award of the National Contract Management Association. In 2003 he was elected as a Director of The Procurement Roundtable. In 2010 the American Political Science Association awarded him the Gaus Prize, which honors a lifetime of achievement in public administration scholarship.He currently serves as editor of the International Public Management Journal, and he writes a regular column for Federal Computer Week and a blog, The Lectern, at FCW.com.From 1993 through 1997, Dr. Kelman served as Administrator of the Office of Federal Procurement Policy in the Office of Management and Budget. During his tenure as Administrator, he played a lead role in the Administration's reinventing government effort. He led Administration efforts in support of the Federal Acquisition Streamlining Act of 1994 and the Federal Acquisition Reform Act of 1995.

Recent Posts

A Government Contractor Crosses Over to USDS

October 11, 2018

Recently I was working on a blog on the spread of civic tech. One of the people discussed in the blog was Kelly O’Connor, who, I discovered, had come to the U.S. Digital Service three years ago from the government contracting community. O’Connor spent eight years working at Deloitte, followed by a year at Gartner and […]

Steve’s Peeve About A Common Contracting Phrase

October 2, 2018

Ask yourself the following question: What is the adjective most commonly used to modify the phrase “government contracts” in mainstream-media articles? The answer, I’m pretty sure, is “lucrative.” As in, “X company or individual won lucrative government contracts for…” Pay attention to the next few times you see coverage of government contracts in the media. […]

Project Management vs. Product Management

September 4, 2018

Search USAJobs under the keyword “project management” and you will find hundreds of postings, Chris Johnston and Kelly O’Connor of the U.S. Digital Service write in a new blog post. But search under “product management,” they note, and you will come up empty. The post landed on my reading list thanks to my friend and colleague Nick Sinai, […]

Should Federal Contracting Be More Like Airbnb?

August 7, 2018

Roger Cohen is a columnist for the New York Times. He mostly writes about foreign policy, but his most-recent column strays from the beaten path to focus on Airbnb. The column begins with an account of a recent conversation Cohen had with Brian Chesky, Airbnb’s founder and CEO. “He told me about trying to raise $150,000 in 2008 for […]

The Rise of the Microconsultants

July 12, 2018

One of the first — and even more than two decades later, still one of the most important — changes during the procurement reform era of the 1990s was the introduction of a “micropurchase” authority in the Federal Acquisition Streamlining Act of 1995. In the background was the desire to allow program customers the ability […]