Content for #Suppliers

Ask anyone in procurement what they most worry about, and most times, you will get an answer that includes the word “afraid.” From fancy corner offices to the cubicles filled with those of the front lines of the agency, there is …
If you haven’t yet, you should check out our brand new Public Spend Forum YouTube channel, where we’re posting a lot of short videos that offer practical tips to help you in your job every day. In one …
It’s well established that “the best leaders are insatiable learners,” as Bill Taylor, founder of Fast Company, once said. I would argue that that same trait is true of people that are best at building genuine relationships.
We so often hear about how difficult it is for the Department of Defense to work with smaller or newer businesses, that it’s often easy to write off any potential working relationship as dead in the water. But that’s exactly why …
Spence Witten is the director of federal sales at cybersecurity vendor Lunarline, Inc. PSF welcomes contributors from across the public sector market. If you're interested in contributing, we'd love to hear from you. I don't know that I've ever said that before. Government Wide Acquisition Contracts (GWACs) and Indefinite Delivery, Indefinite Quantity (IDIQ) solicitations are a nightmare to both write and evaluate. Flashback 10 years ago, to a contract called GSA Alliant I. I was on a team as a subcontractor, along with about 30 other companies, few of whom had ever worked together before. We slammed together a proposal that made no sense and tossed in solutions that we had no intention of delivering. After weeks of frantic days and sleepless nights we eventually dumped on GSA's doorstep a collection of pretty but ultimately meaningless proposal pages. After two years of what I'm sure was the most miserable period of their professional lives, GSA finally awarded Alliant I, and we earned a spot. After a grand win party, I never saw any of my teammates again. To recap: Our proposal offered nothing of value. Our team had no history of working together.  It took the government more than two years to wade through our nonsense and finally make an award. Following award, the team dispersed. The organization that ended up actually delivering on that contract had next to nothing in common with the organization that won. The thing is, as terrible as that sounds (and is), it all started with the way Alliant I was designed.
“Innovative Contracting Case Studies” is a compilation of exemplary methods for getting more innovation per taxpayer dollar. Curated by the White House Office of Science and Technology Policy and the Office of Federal Procurement Policy, each entry highlights public sector …
With many agencies still struggling to implement the requirements in the Federal Information Technology Acquisition Reform Act (FITARA), a new white paper from Censeo Consulting Group and Rich Beutel—the original staff author of FITARA—makes ten recommendations to help agencies take …
Green Tech Media reports that the U.S. Navy has made strides in lessening its carbon footprint and adopting green energy through “massive solar procurements, used submarine battery storage projects and microgrids on bases.” The site points to the recent …
The Associated Builders and Contractors (ABC)—a federal contractor association—has filed a lawsuit in the U.S. District Court for the Eastern District of Texas to stop the implementation of President Barack Obama’s Fair Pay and Safe Workplaces executive order, which is …
Great conversation and podcast with Jay Nath, Chief Innovation Officer for the City of San Francisco. The work he and his colleagues have done to make government a better service provider and a viable customer for entreprenuers the world over …